Denis Urubko, Adam Bielecki and Piotr Tomala, back in K2


JAROSLAW BOTOR ABANDONA

        

At last the helicopter could fly
he had to take the rescuers from Nanga Parbat from Skardu to the base camp
of the K2. Jaroslaw Botor leaves the expedition and returns to Poland for reasons
personal

        

Desnivel.com
– Friday, February 2, 2018 – Updated at 12: 17h

                

                
                

 

                     The helicopter that brought back to the CB of the K2 to Denis Urubko, Adam Bielecki and Piotr Tomala (February 2018)

The helicopter that brought back to the CB of the K2 to Denis Urubko, Adam Bielecki and Piotr Tomala (Photo: Polski Himalaizm Zimowy 2016-2020)

    

 
        
        



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Once-Leading Ontario Climber Dave Lanman Passes


Ontario hard rock pioneer Dave Lanman died in his home in New Paltz on Jan. 28, 2018, at age 57. Dave was a leading figure in the Ontario hard rock climbing scene and one of the first 5.11 and then 5.12 climbers in the province.

Starting in Ontario in the late seventies, accompanied by his brother Steve, his friends Steve Labelle, Mike Tschipper, Geroge Manson, Rob Rohn and Dean Lister, he set out on a course of first ascents of hard routes that set a new standard of difficulty and commitment.

He climbed The Shield on El Capitan when he was just 16 years-old, but his main passion was hard free climbs.

To this end he was instrumental in the development of numerous Niagara Escarpment crags and influenced the new generation of hard local climbers, including Dave and Reg Smart, Marc Bracken, Chris Oates and many others by showing that with a little talent and a lot of hard work, regular suburban kids could climb hard.

In the 1980s, Dave moved to New Paltz to devote himself to climbing in the Gunks. Although by the time he died, he was no longer climbing, he kept in touch with many of his oldest climbing friends and he will be sorely missed.

Dave Lanman Photo Reg Smart



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Review: The Amazing Patagonia Micro Puff Hoody


There’s been a lot of anticipation for the new Patagonia Micro Puff and for good reason, it’s at the leading edge of the synthetic jacket game.

We had the opportunity to visit Indian Creek, Ouray and the Canadian Rockies and to put the new Micro Puff through to the test.

Katsutaka “Jumbo” Yokoyama sporting the Micro Puff in Indian Creek Photo Brandon Pullan

Unlike their much-loved Nano-Air, the Micro Puff aims to act more like a medium down jacket. It was perfect for late fall days in the desert and mid-winter warm spells in the mountains.

The jacket’s two hand-warmer pockets are spacious and mirror the two drop-in interior pockets to save weight. The pockets offer protection from wind and cold weather. Great for keeping the hands warm while your partner work their the project.

The hood is well designed and delivers amazing coverage on the sides and top of your face. Helmets fit snug on top and there’s no bunching of the fabric. A big bonus when the cold wind whips up unexpectedly.

Micro Puff stood up to multiple approach stumbles Photo Brandon Pullan

The Micro Puff really is one of the lightest jackets on the market in this category. We weighed a men’s medium at 260 grams, which is much lighter than the Nano-Air at 380 grams.

For reference, the Arc’teryx Atom LT is 360 grams and the North Face ThermoBall is 390 grams. The Micro Puff is unrivaled when it comes to weight and warmth. Which was great when you’re carrying four racks of cams to the crag.

Chris Van Leuven belaying in the Micro Puff Photo Brandon Pullan

In terms of durability, all super light apparel compromises some of it to save weight. The Micro Puff uses a 10-denier Pertex Quantum for both inside and out and demands that you be careful around sharp rocks and tree branches.

We stumbled down rocky slopes, stepped on it by accident while racking up and dropped it into a running stream at the base of an ice climb. While none of those are recommended, that stuff happens and after a dust off and dry, it was back to new.

When it comes to fashionably, this jacket looks as good downtown as it does in the mountains. It has that nice look Patagonia always pulls off and a great fit.

Post-Rockies climb with Petzl rep Bexx Ferri and the Micro Puff

It’s not a snug-fitting as some midlayers out there, but it’s not as bulky as the Down Sweater or Nano Puff. There’s no adjustable hem, but the stretchy waistband has plenty of give and good mobility.

Overall, we love how much lighter it is than other synthetic hoodies. It packs down small, it fits great for approaches, climbing or around town and doesn’t feel boxy. Highly recommended.



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Indoor Weekly: New Owners Take Possession of Joe Rockheads


Joe Rockheads in Toronto was Canada’s first indoor commercial climbing gym and it was recently sold by the original owners.

The new owners are Luigi Montilla and Jean-Marc de la Plante, who together own Up the Bloc. And de la Plante separately owns Seven Bays Bouldering, Allez Up and BoulderHouse Victoria.

Luigi Montilla and Jean-Marc de la Plante take possession of Joe Rockheads Photo Brandon Pullan

Read the full press release here, which stated, “Our plan is to honour the Joe Rockhead’s brand and culture by breathing new investment, energy and love into the facility. The facility needs updating, but the core values need to remain.”

On Jan. 31, Montilla and de la Plante were busy getting things organize in the gym. They had already unpacked new computers and were working with the staff.

There were brand new holds in the bouldering space, which brought a fresh feel to the already amazing-set problems. Two dozen climbers were huddled around one or two problems, hoping to get a chance to try the grippy plastic.

There were even a few roped routes that had new holds mixed with old ones. The energy was uplifting and the outlook positive.

While Montilla and de la Plante won’t say for certain what their new plans are, they did say there will be big changes to bring new members, but nothing too dramatic to scare off old ones.

Be sure to swing by Joe Rockheads to check out the cool new changes, routes and problems.



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Gear: The Amazing Patagonia Micro Puff Hoody


There’s been a lot of anticipation for the new Patagonia Micro Puff and for good reason, it’s at the leading edge of the synthetic jacket game.

We had the opportunity to visit Indian Creek, Ouray and the Canadian Rockies and to put the new Micro Puff through to the test.

Katsutaka “Jumbo” Yokoyama sporting the Micro Puff in Indian Creek Photo Brandon Pullan

Unlike their much-loved Nano-Air, the Micro Puff aims to act more like a medium down jacket.

The jacket’s two hand-warmer pockets are spacious and mirror the two drop-in interior pockets to save weight. The pockets offer protection from wind and cold weather.

The hood is well designed and delivers amazing coverage on the sides and top of your face. Helmets fit snug on top and there’s no bunching of the fabric.

Micro Puff stood up to multiple approach stumbles Photo Brandon Pullan

The Micro Puff really is one of the lightest jackets on the market in this category. We weighed a men’s medium at 260 grams, which is much lighter than the Nano-Air at 380 grams.

For reference, the Arc’teryx Atom LT is 360 grams and the North Face ThermoBall is 390 grams. The Micro Puff is unrivaled when it comes to weight and warmth.

Chris Van Leuven belaying in the Micro Puff Photo Brandon Pullan

In terms of durability, all super light apparel compromises some of it to save weight. The Micro Puff uses a 10-denier Pertex Quantum for both inside and out and demands that you be careful around sharp rocks and tree branches.

When it comes to fashionably, this jacket looks as good downtown as it does in the mountains. It has that nice look Patagonia always pulls off and a great fit.

Post-Rockies climb with Petzl rep Bexx Ferri and the Micro Puff

It’s not a snug-fitting as some midlayers out there, but it’s not as bulky as the Down Sweater or Nano Puff. There’s no adjustable hem, but the stretchy waistband has plenty of give and good mobility.

Overall, we love how much lighter it is than other synthetic hoodies. It packs down small, it fits great for approaches, climbing or around town and does not feel boxy.



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Four days of showcase of winter sports


GENERAL IMPRESSIONS OF THE SECTOR

        

One more year – and there are already 47 from the
first edition-, the international fair of
reference of winter sports from January 28 to 4 in the German city of
Munich, where 2,801 brands (62 Spanish) have joined
convince us that the sector is in good health. Innovations
fair, although good ideas are never lacking. We have been there for
show it firsthand.

        

Eva Martos / Desnivel.com
– Thursday, February 1, 2018 – Updated at 3:00 p.m.

                

                
                

 

                     Stand of Bestard in Ispo Munich 2018

Stand of Bestard in Ispo Munich 2018 (Elevation)

    

 
        
        

As every year since 1970, the winter sports sector takes off and boasts of good health in Germany, at a fair in which this year we have seen perhaps less movement (with 84,000 visitors it has had some 1,000 less than last year), although with a greater number of exhibitors, in total 2,801 exhibitors among which has been noted the absence of important brands (such as Dynafit, Salewa or Salomon), which have opted for do not go in this edition.

According to the organizers, according to the origin of visitors the most important growth has come from (in this order) Austria, Japan, Turkey, Czech Republic, Great Britain and the United States. Spaniards maintain their moderate presence, with a small number of retailers that remain faithful to the tradition of traveling to Munich to explore the trends that will set the tone in the collections of next autumn / winter. How not increase sales abroad has been the main objective of the 62 Spanish firms present in the Ispo many of which have moved their optimism for the good balance of 2017 and among which we have seen interesting initiatives.

Some conclusions

In the half hundred of videos that we have been doing during the four days of fair we will show you the most interesting news for the mountain sports that have been presented, for now we share here some general impressions that we have perceived during these exhausting days of talking with trademark managers, commercials, store owners, product developers, marketing managers or specialized media partners:

  • Sustainability sells: more and more brands offer waterproof membranes free of contaminants PFCs, even giants such as Gore-Tex or Polartec are making important investments in this line; we have also seen a notable increase in the use of recycled fabrics or fibers from plants (such as corn or coconut) fully recyclable, as well as a greater awareness for reducing energy in manufacturing, among other initiatives … We like this argument selling! And without a doubt the planet appreciates it. In our hands, that of consumers, is to support these proposals and choose the most sustainable products.
  • The shadow of Amazon is long: the impossibility of competing with the prices that marks the leader of the Internet sale has been one of the most heard concerns especially in the mouth of the owners of medium and small stores . But there are solutions and many brands show it; it's about adapting to the increasingly demanded sale online without losing the reins of your product. It is difficult, but not impossible.
  • Mountain skiing continues to rise: the early snows of this winter have favored sales in the ski sector and in particular skimo, a modality that continues to gain supporters from both skiing and running or the world of the mountain. The models that increase the most are the boards and multipurpose boots for a beginner or mid-level user who does not want to do without the lightness. Also novelties in the skimo boots of competition, where the carbon is replaced by the more affordable Grilamid before the new requirements set by the ski mountaineering federation.
  • Increase in women's collections: is a reality that more and more women scale, run, ski, are in the mountains … and brands do not want to let all these potential consumers go by increasing the supply of products very care designed specifically for them, not only with clothing, but with shoes, backpacks or bags designed for female morphology.
  • and "Lifestyle" lines: although brands are concerned about not having a "top of the range" line that gives them recognition and meets the requirements of climbers or himalayans in extreme conditions, they know that the bulk of the average user uses the garments to take a walk through the countryside, or even for their urban day-to-day, and therefore it is the latter who are the most targeted by many of the new collections.
  • Shy presence of technology: despite the "Ispo Digitalize" section in which you could see curious technological initiatives (such as the manufacture of a shoe sole with a 3D printer, instant shoe personalization to your These are still specific actions, more showcase than anything else, which still need to be traversed to be integrated into the usual manufacturing or sales processes. .
  • It does not matter so much the product you have, but how you transmit it: a good part of the fair (the recondite "C pavilions") is occupied by suppliers of fabrics and raw materials from different countries -mainly from Asia- those that were happening much of the product developers of the different firms. Obviously there are differences in design, qualities, finishes … but above all brands seek to distinguish themselves in the message they convey, in the identification of a product with a lifestyle or philosophy of life, easy to connect in a field as passionate as It is the mountain. More than a thousand journalists (and bloggers, and influencers … not always independent) of different nationalities walked the stands trying to decipher the true impact of the new products.

Punctual innovations

From a helmet with an internal sheet that rotates and dissipates the impact, to new padded fillings with a mixture of synthetic and natural fibers (the combinations seem endless), a shoe insole with an inner circuit that is heated and handled from the mobile ( patent by the way of a Spanish firm), feather jackets with seams made without seams and laminated, cat feet with three-dimensional soles, the aforementioned recyclable organic fabrics, a helmet with bluetooth to be able to talk on the mobile while skiing, soles for walking on the ice even more adherent, backpacks lighter, more complete, more functional, more … R & D departments of the brands have not stopped working. For now we leave you here a gallery of sample photos; do not miss our channel Youtube Desnivel.tv and the videos that we will be publishing soon with the most interesting news that we will see in stores next season of autumn / winter 2018.

                

Invent to overcome the limits

                                

 Mountaineering. The saga of inventions "src =" http://static.desnivel.com/images/2016/10/26/alpinismo-la-saga-de-los-inventos_p.jpg "style =" margin: 5px; float: left; border-width: 0px; border-style: solid; height: 171px; width: 150px;

Mountaineering. The saga of inventions

by Gilles Modica

Invent to ascend, invent to survive … always invent to overcome the limits of snow, rock and ice.

                                

All those ingenious advances

                                

 Book cover: Climbing Tools, by Eber Cameselle "src =" http://static.desnivel.com/images/2017/12/12/climbing-tools-9788498294095.jpg "style =" width : 150px; height: 207px; border-width: 0px; border-style: solid; margin: 5px; float: left;

Climbing Tools

by Eber Cameselle

This book documents and collects the names of those dreamers who materialized the tools necessary to reach any peak. On the other hand, it has a more pragmatic and tangible functional variant that involves developing a great typology: covering all the tools and tools used in modern mountaineering and structuring and cataloging all these ingenious advances, accompanied by an illustration work in charge of shaping to this project.

                                



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A Morning with American Ice and Comp Climber Tyler Kempney


Sitting on a crashpad-couch, Tyler Kempney slides a hand through his hair as he tries to remember the chronology of the last few days. Since Thursday, he’s climbed at Poke-O-Moonshine (Adirondacks), New York, Snake Mountain, Vermont, and took second at the Petra Cliffs drytool comp.

“This year I decided to try out ice comps, and to see how I would do without specifically training for them,” he says.

Kempney taking second place at the Smugglers’ Notch Ice Bash kickoff party at Petra Cliffs in Burlington, Vermont. Photo: Sam Simon.

The weekend prior, Jan. 18 to 21, he competed at the 23rd Anual Ouray Ice Fest where he took fifth in men’s and seventh overall. He placed mid-pack in speed. “I am not a fast climber,” he says with a snicker.

Kempney, 26, from Carthage, New York, started climbing rock six years ago. “I learn from watching movement,” he says. A year after he began rock climbing, he started coaching at The Edge Halfmoon. “Once you teach something, you understand it really well,” he says.

A year later, in 2013, he started climbing ice and mixed.

Today, he climbs 150 days outside and visits the gym only once to twice a month. He regularly climbs 5.12 trad, WI5 and loves mixed.

Though he’s climbed Red Bull and Vodka M11 a steep bolted line in Colorado’s East Vail Amphitheatre, he prefers naturally protected ice and rock routes in the M8 range.

Sat., Jan. 27: Kempney dynoing for the ice on Paradigm Shift M8. Photo: Pete Hoang

Sitting down with Kempney

We’re at the specialty gear shop Rock and Resole located in the corner of a warehouse in Boulder, Colorado.

The phones are ringing off the hook and the interview is constantly interrupted when he picks up and talks with customers. He works here as the rock shoe buyer.

Surrounding us are 80 models of shoes, “and more coming in,” he says. Haulbags hang from the walls, as do ropes of varying lengths, plus too many carabiners.

“I don’t do just one type of climbing,” he says, “I enjoy bouldering, sport, trad, pure cracks, offwidth and ice/mixed. I move very statically and like to lock everything off. Onsighting is my favourite.”

Here One Minute, Gone the Next

Aside from traveling across the country to compete, Kempney also seeks rarely formed ice routes in Colorado’s Front Range.

Last October, he took advantage of a cold snap and drove from his home in Boulder at 3 a.m. to climb the first ascent of an ice route 60 metres right of Smear of Smear WI5 at the base of the Diamond in Rocky Mountain National Park.

The sun was just starting to hit the wall when he reached the face at 7:30 a.m. He and his partner, Ryan Kempf, made it 15 metres up the wall, via drytooling, before retreating due to melting conditions.

In less than a minute after retreating all the surrounding ice routes collapsed. “As we pulled our ropes our route fell,” he says.

Oct. 5, 2017: Kempney and Ryan Kempf packing their bags as the route they just attempted falls to the ground. Photo: Erik Aagaard.

(Read more about Kempney and Kempf’s collapsing ice climbing story in the upcoming issue of Gripped.)

What’s next for Kempney? “This Saturday, I’m going up to climb The Squid M6 WI5. Next week, I’ll be training with kids from the USA Youth Ice Climbing Team drytooling on the treadwall at The Spot bouldering gym.

Kempney climbing the elite mixed route during the 23rd Annual Ouray Ice Fest. Kempney took 5th in men’s and 7th overall. Photo: Brad Mcmillon.

Kempney will be competing at the North American Ice Championship in Fenton, Michigan from March 16 to 18.

To learn more about Kempey, follow him on Instagram.



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Elisabeth Revol tells about her experience in the winter Nanga Parbat


Desnivel.com
– Thursday, February 1, 2018 – Updated at 2:00 p.m.

Elisabeth Revol is admitted to the Hôpitaux du
Pays du Mont-Blanc in Salanches, recovering from the severe freezes that
dragged from the tragic end of his expedition with Tomek Mackiewicz to Nanga
Winter Parbat
. It has affected both hands and the left foot, and still
you will need about ten more days of treatment in the hospital institution.

In his hospital room, he has granted an interview to
AFP, which was published yesterday on the page
web
of this French news agency. In it, Elisabeth Revol narrates in
first person everything that happened
from the summit until it was rescued and
evacuated, going through his separation of Tomek Mackiewicz. We review to
continuation the most outstanding passages.

Attack on summit with
doubts

January 25 was the day marked in red on the calendar
to try to reach the summit. Elisabeth Revol says that "we felt
well at that moment "
just before facing" the complicated stretch "of the
Somali pyramid. They were late and towards 17:15 and still with
Some meters ahead they were assaulted by the doubts about whether to turn around .
They went ahead and 45 minutes later, at around 18:00, they crowned
the 8,125 meters
.

First problems of
Tomek Mackiewicz

On the same top, Tomek Mackiewicz told Elisabeth Revol
I had problems. "There Tomek told me 'I do not see anything'. He had not used a mask
because there was a small veil during the day and at nightfall, I had a
ophthalmia. We do not take a second at the top. It was a down flight "
.

They started the descent with Tomek leaning on the shoulder of
Elisabeth, at night and through difficult terrain. "At one point, he did not
he could breathe, he took off the protection he had in front of his mouth and
It began to freeze. His nose turned white and then his hands, his feet … "

They got into a crack to take shelter from the wind, since
Tomek Mackiewicz did not have the strength to reach the camp. At the break
the day, Elisabeth Revol says that "there was blood constantly flowing from her
mouth "
clear sign of edema.

Alert and separation
of Tomek

"I warned everyone, because Tomek could not descend by
his account "
explains Elisabeth Revol, who tells how the rescue was proposed: " Me
They said: if you descend to 6,000 m, we can recover and we can recover
Tomek at 7,200 m. And that's how it was done. It was not a decision that I made,
it was imposed on me "
.

So, he told Tomek Mackiewicz that the helicopters
they would arrive that same afternoon, that she had to go down and that they would go to
collect. He sent the GPS coordinates of his position, he protected his companion
better than he could and started the descent "without taking anything, or store, or sack, nothing …
because the helicopters were going to arrive that afternoon "
. But they did not arrive.

Second night at
weathering

Tomek was still in the crack at 7,200 m, while Elisabeth had
down to 6,800 m. "I knew I was going to get out of that, I was in my hole,
Shivering with cold but I was not in a desperate position. I feared more for
Tomek, who was much more debilitated "
. There, he suffered a hallucination: "they came
to bring me hot tea and, as thanks, I had to give them a shoe "
. HE
He took it out and had his foot off for five hours in which he suffered frostbite.

Helicopters do not
they arrive

The next day, Elisabeth Revol decided not to move, for "keep
the heat "
waiting for the helicopter. Later, listen to the sound of a
helicopter over the glacier, "but it was too late and had
lifted
wind "
. He understood then that the device would not reach her and,
risk of a third night in the open, changed his mind and resumed the descent. "It started
to be a matter of survival "
notes.

Elisabeth Revol did not receive the sms informing her that Denis
Urubko and Adam Bielecki were going towards her. "Calm, wet gloves, cool cold,
pain "
are some of the memories of those hours of nocturnal descent. At
3:30 hours reached the C2 (6,300 m). He gets excited when he remembers that "I saw two
frontales in the middle of the night. I started screaming and told myself that it was good "
.

A little later, Denis Urubko and Adam Bielecki -with whom
had planned to climb Everest on a project that did not come to fruition
she. "It was a great emotion" .

Recover and visit
to the children of Tomek

Asked about her upcoming plans, Elisabeth Revol points out
that now goes day by day, with the aim of recovering to the maximum to avoid
eventual amputations and to be able to "go see the children of Tomek" . Plus
forward, he will return to the mountains: "I need them, they are so beautiful" .

                

Step by step, with the necessary tenacity not to give up

                                

 Cover of the book Nanga by Simone Moro. "Src =" http://static.desnivel.com/images/2017/10/26/nanga_web.jpg "style =" margin: 5px; padding: 0px; line-height: normal; border: 0px solid; font-size: 1em; width: 150px; height: 230px; float: left; "/> </p>
<h5>
</h5>
<p> NANGA; </p>
<p> <em> by Simone Moro </em> </p>
<p> Step by step, with the necessary tenacity not to surrender, and with the permanent respect towards the mountain, the nature and the limits of the human being. </p>
<p>                                </p></div>
</div>
</div>
</pre>
<p><br />
<br /><a href=Source link

She, a paradise of trekking in Sri Lanka


Enjoy two routes

        

Traveling to Sri Lanka is one of the things we should all do
Before die. This Asian island country opens the doors of its
culture since we set foot in it and the impressive benefits
The natural attractions that it enjoys are the main attraction.

        

Thursday, February 1, 2018 – Updated at 10: 05h

                

                
                

 

                     Grand Voyage, Sri Lanka

Grand Voyage, Sri Lanka (Sri Lanka)

    

 
        
        

Traveling
to Sri Lanka
is one of the things that we should all do before
die. This Asian island country opens the doors of its
culture since we set foot in it and the impressive benefits
natural resources it enjoys are the main attraction of thousands of
tourists who come to this island looking for new adventures: it is one of
the most important tea importers in the world and has in its
territory the world capital of Buddhism, Kandy, where it is preserved
the only relic belonging to the Buddha: a tooth of his.

In the middle of those privileged landscapes we find Ella a population located between mountains of an enviable vegetation, at 1,040 meters above sea level ,
 with a tourist infrastructure that is increasing due to the high
tourist demand. In addition to the tranquility that the
Travelers who come to this town, Ella is perfect for lovers
hiking and trekking, especially two routes that you have to
go almost compulsory if you're thinking about visiting this
region in your next vacation.

Little Adam's Peak

The first one is the route that takes us to Little Adam's Peak .
 As soon as you start the tour you will see the impressive plantations of
Tea grown by locals and those who are so often heard talking about
speaks of Sri Lanka. The route can take from 45 minutes to 2 hours (round trip) ,
 depending on the time you take in stopping to enjoy the
sight, the landscape and the fresh wind that is breathed in the area.

Al
 get to the top it's worth it to feel a little while to enjoy your
feat, since it is possible that from there you can see the Ravana Falls one of the most famous waterfalls in Sri Lanka. Although it is a hiking trail
 well-known, it is very possible that you do not cross with anyone in your
path to the top, which makes this path an option
privileged for those looking for a bit of physical activity and fresh air .

Ella Rock

The second route that is worth mentioning is the route that takes us to the top of Ella Rock . This is a slightly longer walk than the previous one, and in both of them it is highly recommendable to take sufficient water reserves
 to support the route that, although there is usually a good climate,
Hiking plans like these involve a physical activity that can
Wear you halfway and prevent you from enjoying the quality of the place.

To get to Ella Rock you start right on the train tracks that comes from Nuwara Eliya (the
 city ​​considered the most important tea producing area in the country)
you have to cross a couple of fairly quiet local villages, mostly
 dedicated to agriculture until the path begins to ascend
until reaching a stretch of forest quite dense. You will know that you have
come when you reach the piece of open rock that forms a precipice
 and from which you will have an incredible panorama. If you did the route
above, this is perfect to close the mission of hiking in
Sri Lanka, because Ella Rock is right across from Little Adam's
Peak.

                



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